“This was dance as I had never seen before, from the bursting of life from the primordial soup, the evolution of creatures and then Man, and the evolution of human society to its eventual destruction.”
Review here

Jowheretogo, 2013

“The 10 strong dance company Nobulus features two women who add the grace and flow associated with more traditional dance, to the more angular movements of hip hop dancing resulting in a wonderful synthesis of styles…. wonderful choreography and some incredible skills from the dancers.”
Review here

The Public Reviews, 2013

“The timing of the dancing and choreography to stay in time with the detailed soundtrack was impeccable and the cast showed off amazing moves with breakdancing, ballet and body popping.” REVIEW HERE

Bournemouth Echo, 2013

“The solo performances seem almost glorious – the level of control and body awareness is astounding” Review Here

Oxford Playwriters, 2013

“Nobulus create engaging theatrical dance experiences by combining classical music with urban dance and story telling elements.” Review Here

Pope Wainwright, 2013

“A terrific amount of wit and invention” Review Here

The Telegraph, 2013

The Austrian Nobulus scored a hit with the fresh physical invention streaking their cautionary tale Out of the Shadow.

Donald Hutera, 2008

From Austria, Moving Shadows presented a mesmerizing ensemble work, Out of the Shadow, from Alex V-Cell Wengler, which played with patterns, shapes and metaphors of life in a pre and post Lapsarian world. To a soundtrack of Richard Strauss, Verdi and the like we saw primal images of sacrifice and betrayal, of love and pleasure, of death and destruction dressed in the most brilliant of artistry. Ovations aplenty declared that we need to see more of this company and more of this choreographer. He seems to me, and I am sure Jonzi D too, filled with hip-hop hope.

Ian Palmer, Ballet.co.uk, 2007

The highlight of the night came from Austrian Crew, Moving Shadows. In a set, which followed the evolution of man, from birth through to war, destruction and death, the white-clad narrator was a mesmerising presence among the black moving figures on stage. Agility, flexibility and strength leapt out with one-armed handstands held for minutes at a time and bodies expertly morphing into each other. As the black shadows moved the audience got caught in the raw energy of watching a new vibrant dance-style evolve in front of them.

Emma Youle, The Islington Gazette, 2007

The strong team of Moving Shadows essayed a mammoth fable of evolution with an antiwar message, calling on musical support from bursts of Khachaturian, Richard Strauss, Rachmaninov and La Donna è Mobile. Nothing if not eclectic.

David Dougill, Sunday Times, 2007

Alex Wengler’s masterpiece was unlike anything I’ve seen in terms of originality and captured the true artform of dance.

RWD Magazine

Moving Shadows, who earnestly aimed to dramatise the history of the human soul, could have headed for worse disaster – thrillingly, however, their choreography turned out to be as superb as their scenario was gauche. Tall, wired and graceful, this Austrian crew used the disjointed, cartoonish energy of hip hop to transform themselves into an eerie variety of forms – from flickering cosmic matter to an apocalyptic battle of human tanks and guns.

Judith Mackrell, The Guardian, 2007

“Tall, wired and graceful, this Austrian crew used the disjointed, cartoonish energy of hip hop to transform themselves into an eerie variety of forms – from flickering cosmic matter to an apocalyptic battle of human tanks and guns.”

The Guardian

Jawdropping

Ballet.co.uk

Nobulus from Austria drove the audience wild… loaded with freshness and verve.

The Times